Women of Color who like Women of Color

This blog is for women of color interested in other women of color. This is a safe space for WOC and gender non-conforming POC. The primary point of this blog is for queer WOC to come together and share common interests that could perhaps lead to more. WOCWLWOC is a place to meet others like yourself, which may be difficult in your offline life. This blog operates much like GWLG, but current events and queer/feminist texts can also be shared, and it's highly encouraged. QTPOC are encouraged to submit as well.


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Reblogged from unapproachableblackchicks
unapproachableblackchicks:


On Gender Norms and Young Black Girls
JULY 7, 2014BYCIARA MYERS, EDITOR 1 COMMENT
By Riki WilchinsTrueChildhttp://www.truechild.org
Riki Wilchins is the Executive Director at TrueChild, an organization that aids donors, policy-makers and practitioners in reconnecting race, class and gender through “gender transformative” approaches challenging rigid gender norms and inequities. Wilchins has authored three books on gender theory and has appeared in a number of anthologies and publications on the subject. Her work has led her to be profiled by The New York Times, and she was once selected as one of Time Magazine’s “100 Civic Innovators for the 21st Century.” Here, Wilchins discusses what we can do to correct the effects of gender norms on young, black girls.
Decades of researchhas found that challenging harmful gender norms are a key to improving life outcomes for at-risk communities.
For instance, young women who internalize narrow feminine ideals that prioritize motherhood, dependence, vulnerability and appearance have lower life outcomes in reproductive health, education and economic empowerment.
Major international donor agencies like PEPFAR, USAID, UNAIDs, and WHO have all implemented “gender transformative” initiatives that challenge traditional gender norms, and found them effective (an introductory paper is here).
Gender impacts every issue funders address; yet donors and grantees are seldom challenged to do innovative work around gender.
As a senior program officer put it, “My staff and grantees get race and class, but where’s the gender analysis? What I want to know is—what happened to gender?”
Part of the answer to her question may lie in new report onyoung Black girlswe conducted for the Heinz Endowments.
We found that Black adolescent girls and young women face special barriers related to both race and gender which have immense effects on their health, achievement and life outcomes. And this was especially true for low-income Black girls, who also have challenges associated with poverty.
First, Black girls’ unique race and gendered experiences of discrimination result in multiple stresses that – over time – impair their immune systems.
Also, they must navigate social hostilities based on race as well as pressures to conform to traditional feminine ideals and those specific to Black communities.
Moreover, feminine norms in the Black community often prioritize caretaking and self-sacrifice. Black girls may be silently encouraged to focus on others’ health while ignoring signals of pain and illness until their own bodies are in crisis.
The additive impact of these stresses can produce a “weathering effect,” in which Black women’s bodies become physically and biologically vulnerable, resulting in high rates of chronic disorders, reproductive health problems, infant mortality and obesity.



Download the report here

unapproachableblackchicks:

On Gender Norms and Young Black Girls


By Riki Wilchins
TrueChild
http://www.truechild.org

Riki Wilchins is the Executive Director at TrueChild, an organization that aids donors, policy-makers and practitioners in reconnecting race, class and gender through “gender transformative” approaches challenging rigid gender norms and inequities. Wilchins has authored three books on gender theory and has appeared in a number of anthologies and publications on the subject. Her work has led her to be profiled by The New York Times, and she was once selected as one of Time Magazine’s “100 Civic Innovators for the 21st Century.” Here, Wilchins discusses what we can do to correct the effects of gender norms on young, black girls.


Decades of researchhas found that challenging harmful gender norms are a key to improving life outcomes for at-risk communities.

For instance, young women who internalize narrow feminine ideals that prioritize motherhood, dependence, vulnerability and appearance have lower life outcomes in reproductive health, education and economic empowerment.

Major international donor agencies like PEPFAR, USAID, UNAIDs, and WHO have all implemented “gender transformative” initiatives that challenge traditional gender norms, and found them effective (an introductory paper is here).

Gender impacts every issue funders address; yet donors and grantees are seldom challenged to do innovative work around gender.

As a senior program officer put it, “My staff and grantees get race and class, but where’s the gender analysis? What I want to know is—what happened to gender?”

Part of the answer to her question may lie in new report onyoung Black girlswe conducted for the Heinz Endowments.

We found that Black adolescent girls and young women face special barriers related to both race and gender which have immense effects on their health, achievement and life outcomes. And this was especially true for low-income Black girls, who also have challenges associated with poverty.

First, Black girls’ unique race and gendered experiences of discrimination result in multiple stresses that – over time – impair their immune systems.

Also, they must navigate social hostilities based on race as well as pressures to conform to traditional feminine ideals and those specific to Black communities.

Moreover, feminine norms in the Black community often prioritize caretaking and self-sacrifice. Black girls may be silently encouraged to focus on others’ health while ignoring signals of pain and illness until their own bodies are in crisis.

The additive impact of these stresses can produce a “weathering effect,” in which Black women’s bodies become physically and biologically vulnerable, resulting in high rates of chronic disorders, reproductive health problems, infant mortality and obesity.

Download the report here

(via fuckyeahlgbtqblackpeople)

Reblogged from loggingoutofpatriarchy

queerwoc:

loggingoutofpatriarchy:

No one gives a flying fucking fuck about qwoc apart from other qwoc

We all we got! 

^^^^^

Reblogged from adorablelesbiancouples
adorablelesbiancouples:

Left http://tumblr.com/nerdykidwashington
Me http://tumblr.com/gayloveandmakeup

We have been together for three years. She is my first and only real lesbian relationship, and when I tell you I have never been on a crazy roller coaster of love and emotions like I have been with her. But the passion I have for her exceeds all obstacles. She is my soulmate and my everything.

I love you baby, sorry for all the bullshit over the years :/

adorablelesbiancouples:

Left http://tumblr.com/nerdykidwashington
Me http://tumblr.com/gayloveandmakeup

We have been together for three years. She is my first and only real lesbian relationship, and when I tell you I have never been on a crazy roller coaster of love and emotions like I have been with her. But the passion I have for her exceeds all obstacles. She is my soulmate and my everything.

I love you baby, sorry for all the bullshit over the years :/

Reblogged from autostraddle

Emily Rios Is Gay, Relates to Her Lesbian Role in “The Bridge”

autostraddle:

Emily Rios Is Gay, Relates to Her Lesbian Role in “The Bridge”

image

Emily Rios, who plays lesbian reporter Adriana Mendez in FX series The Bridge, came out during an interview at TCA’s FX day. 

In the show, a crime drama about a bi-national police force attempting to catch a serial killer plaguing the Texas-Chihuahua border, Emily Rios plays reporter and Juarez native Adriana with a female partner who is a nurse named Lucy. About their dynamic, Rios says, “You’re…

View On WordPress

Reblogged from gaywrites
Reblogged from watchtheswitch

CASTING CALL: POC GENDERQUEER / NON-BINARY FEMME

watchtheswitch:

image

This is a casting call for a paid role. Check below the “Read More” line for the actual casting call. Please help us spread the word!

Watching our own pilot, something became apparent. While our show has POC actors, all were of lighter complexion, and we hadn’t created space for actors with darker skin tones. That meant we weren’t creating a show that our whole audience could see themselves in. That didn’t sit right.

Addie is a new role that we’ve added to the show. They’re a genderqueer POC (of darker complexion). At the start of the show, Addie and Su work together. Su moves on, but their lives intersect every once in a while.

Addie has a scene early on where they’re still presenting as a man, but in subsequent scenes are living out as a genderqueer / non-binary femme. Their role in the first season is limited, but their story stretches into future seasons.

Our casting call is below the “Read More” line. Please help us spread the word! This is an important opportunity for QTPOC actors!

Read More

(via bisexual-books)

Reblogged from wertheyouth

wertheyouth:

Yayyyy! The We Are the Youth book has arrived! To read the individual stories of LGBTQ youth order your copy today! 

The book is being published by space-made, which is also publishing the rad interruptmag's LGBT*Love issue.

(via fuckyeahlgbtqblackpeople)

Reblogged from harmonyinkpress

harmonyinkpress:

We’re seeking submissions of Young Adult stories with bisexual main characters! We’re looking for main characters ages 14-18 who experience positive character growth though the story.

Please see the information in the poster above or check our our submission guidelines.

See a more complete list of what we’re looking for at the original post. And please, give us feedback if there’s something you’d like to see that we’ve left out.

(via bisexual-community)

Reblogged from bialogue-group

bialogue-group:

New Documentary Highlights Discrimination Within the Black Lesbian/(and Bisexual) Community

The Same Difference is an hour-long documentary about lesbians who discriminate against other lesbians and bisexual women by Nneka Onuorah, an associate producer for BET.

“It’s almost like a gang,” Onuorah tells ELIXHER. “This is the criteria. This is what you have to do or you’re not a part of it, you’re not in it, or you’re not real. I thought that was ridiculous” … she wanted to start the conversation and shed some light on those issues …

So far, the teaser has been well received. The LGBT community wants to see it because they are living this every day…

Her fundraising goal is $15,000 and the money raised will go to production costs for her to complete the film. Onuorah does not want to only get the major city perspectives that are always seen. She wants to talk to people in states like Utah, Arkansas, and Washington … she also wants to make sure the message is heard by everyone, not just the lesbian community.

“It’s the same difference,” she says. “It’s not like we [lesbians] just face discrimination or we discriminate against each other and have stereotypes. This happens in the African American [heterosexual] community. From culture to culture, we’re doing this to each other. You can take the ‘lesbian’ out of the film and it will still be as powerful”The Same Difference is sure to spark a national dialogue around identity and the way we police one another. Give what you can to help make this important film happen. Donate here.

(Source: youtube.com, via gothramen)

Reblogged from bisexual-books
Reblogged from queersamwilson

queeringfeministreality:

bisexualbuckybarnes:

  1. Jewish Latina/Korean bi trans girl Janice x lesbian African American cis girl Tamika 
  2. aro ace Jamaican cis woman FOW x biro bisexual Navajo cis woman Josie
  3. queer Morroccan Muslim cis woman Dana x queer Indian genderfluid Vithya
  4. lesbian Peruvian cis woman Hannah Guiterrez x panro pansexual Cuban agender Lucy Guiterrez
  5. panro pansexual Latino cis guy Paolo x biro gay Chinese cis guy Leland

Okay wow I was gonna catch up with POC Night Vale Week today but I spent all my time on the Queer Day…

omg all about this.

(Source: queersamwilson, via gardenfulloflavender)

Reblogged from reclaimingthelatinatag
Reblogged from singleplaidqueer
Reblogged from adorablelesbiancouples
adorablelesbiancouples:

When it comes to loving her I don’t know where to start, she came into my life when I wasn’t looking for love. Now almost 7 months later, I’m happy to say she’s mine. 
12-17-13
Tangie(left) Zoe(right)
http://thezangiethings.tumblr.com/

adorablelesbiancouples:

When it comes to loving her I don’t know where to start, she came into my life when I wasn’t looking for love. Now almost 7 months later, I’m happy to say she’s mine. 

12-17-13

Tangie(left) Zoe(right)

http://thezangiethings.tumblr.com/